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Psychology Today bath salts

Posted by on October 3, 2014 – 02:30 pm

Psychology Today bath salts

A few weeks ago a story hit main stream media about a cannibal attack in Miami. On May 28, police shot a man who was found eating a homeless man alive, consuming approximately 75% of his face. What on earth would drive someone to such gruesome insanity? According to police the answer could be found in bath salts. No, I m not talking about your everyday bath luxury; this type of bath salts has nothing to do with bathing and everything to do with a highly addictive and deadly substance. And just who s consuming bath salts? Teens and young adults…

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Psychology Today am I in love

Posted by on September 10, 2015 – 08:20 am

Psychology Today am I in love

If psychologists could define love, they’d be far ahead of every poet, playwright, and songwriter who’s ever tried to put this elusive feeling into words. Love mostly provides pleasure, but as many of us know, that pleasure can come with a heavy price. It may be more correct to view love not as an emotion, but a state or situation that can produce emotions both positive and negative. Still, that begs the question—what is the nature of this state, and why is it so important to our sense of well-being to have those pleasurable feelings? Unlike the…

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Writing for Psychology Today

Posted by on March 23, 2015 – 05:00 pm

Writing for Psychology Today

The association of article features on citations. The authors measured whether a certain feature (e.g., having fewer words than the typical abstract published in the same journal [Row 1a]) led to a significant increase (blue) or decrease (red) in total citations. Weconsidered an effect positive or negative only if the associated probability of being zero was smaller than 0.01/15. Source: plos one/open access Rule 1: Write with Sufficient Length to Tell the Full Story You can see in the Figure above, that in psychology, a shorter abstract with fewer…

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Psychology Today ADHD Test

Posted by on December 20, 2014 – 05:44 pm

Psychology Today ADHD Test

According to Mischel, what is needed for adequate self-control in any situation is adequate development of the brain’s management system—its executive functions (EF). He writes that children who have well-developed EF during preschool can not only resist the temptation to grab the one marshmallow, but also can inhibit other impulsive responses, keep instructions in mind, and focus their attention to do schoolwork. He notes that “those children whose EF functioning is not developing well in preschool years are at increased risk for ADHD and a variety…

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Work for Psychology Today

Posted by on October 30, 2014 – 05:11 pm

Work for Psychology Today

Technology is one reason why employees may not detach from work. Source: Unsplash/Creative Commons Zero (CC0) License So it seems that there are some real pressures on many of us not to detach from work, especially if we want to get ahead in our careers. Consider, though, the cost of not detaching. Research has shown that when people do not regularly detach from work, there is a very real cost in terms of the depletion of mental and physical energy (Ten Brummelhuis & Bakker, 2012). There is also a more subtle, and perhaps in the long run…

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Psychology Today am I normal

Posted by on March 26, 2015 – 09:39 am

Psychology Today am I normal

They call him the Shark. Bill, a 26-year-old lawyer, is proud of his nickname and the ruthlessness that inspired it. Confident and charming, he can also be arrogant, manipulative and deceptive—though he sees nothing wrong with these qualities, useful as they are in winning cases and attracting women. Lately, however, Bill s character has been landing him in trouble. He s begun abusing cocaine. He can t resist the temptations of strip clubs and casinos. He s already been married and divorced twice. Even his successful career has been endangered…

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Life lessons Psychology Today

Posted by on February 9, 2015 – 11:39 am

Life lessons Psychology Today

A healthier approach when you don t see eye to eye in a relationship you want to keep: Look inward to fix the problem rather than trying to change the other person,says Northwestern University psychologist Eli Finkel—even if that just means practicing acceptance. If you know your partner hates large gatherings, consider attending the next party solo so he doesn t have to make forced conversation and you don t have to leave early (and annoyed). Or if your son says he wants to forgo college for now, try to express enthusiasm for his budding career…

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