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Psychology Books

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Cat Psychology books

Posted by on October 28, 2015 – 07:21 pm

Cat Psychology books

Do cats really have nine lives? Maybe so maybe not. But if they do, it’s because they have secrets for keeping cool and calm. Here are two “Cat Secrets” from Cool Cats, Calm Kids: Relaxation and Stress Management for Young People by therapist and educator Mary L. Williams: “Meow meow” (Translation: “I want in. I want out. I want in.”) A cat knows it never hurts to ask. So be honest and speak up! First, search yourself for how you feel. Sad, happy, angry or hurt, it is okay to say how you feel and ask for what you need. Try it — “Mom, Dad. I’m lonely…

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Power Psychology books

Posted by on October 16, 2015 – 11:26 am

Power Psychology books

Inventing Our Selves proposes a radical new approach to the analysis of our current regime of the self, and the values of autonomy, identity, individuality, liberty and choice that animate it. It argues that psychology, psychiatry, psychotherapy and other psy disciplines have played a key role in inventing our selves,changing the ways in which human beings understand and act upon themselves, and how they are acted upon by politicians, managers, doctors, therapists and a multitude of other authorities. These mutations are intrinsically linked…

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Baby Psychology books

Posted by on April 6, 2014 – 12:19 pm

Baby Psychology books

Babies and toddlers may be lovable in most ways, but they still can do things that are provocative. Even the youngest of princes and princesses have potential to trigger the worst sides of the royalty they call Mom and Dad. It s best though to refrain from threats, punishments or even getting mad. Punishment can breed negative reactions like resentment and fear. Positive parent techniques by contrast breed self-confidence and empathy for others. Effective upbeat ways of handling young children also keep the tone of a household positive, decreasing…

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Game theory Psychology book

Posted by on October 2, 2013 – 12:10 pm

Game theory Psychology book

The economics is solid—the authors know their stuff and they apply it well. Too well, actually, because they succumb to one of the worst flaws of economists (and social scientists in general): favoring a convenient model when it contradicts the real world. No model can capture the myriad intricacies of real world behavior, and by necessity they have to leave less important things out to focus on the more important things. But when important things are left out because they don t fit into a preferred modeling framework, the model is driving the study…

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Psychology for Beginners books

Posted by on February 12, 2015 – 02:58 pm

Psychology for Beginners books

Can personality and intelligence be measured? Is being physically attractive an advantage? Is it really better to forgive and forget? How do babies learn to perceive and think? Can listening to Mozart improve IQ? What happens when we sleep?Attempting to answer these questions and more, psychology - the scientific study of human and nonhuman behaviour - has never been more popular. From TV experts to the amateur musings of your best friend, the language of psychology has permeated all aspects of everyday life. Here, the author proves that modern…

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Fun Psychology books to read

Posted by on March 8, 2015 – 05:58 pm

Fun Psychology books to read

Writng about psychological topics for a general audience can be tricky. As a college professor and popular psychology book editor, I have to tell some writers, You don t have enough psychology in that paper. I also have to tell people (sometimes the same people), You re not writing a journal article.You don t have enough psychology in that paper. vs. You re not writing a journal article. It s not really a case of versus,though. Students, teachers, bloggers, magazine writers, chapter authors, and anyone else trying to tell the masses about…

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Cat Psychology book PDF

Posted by on February 21, 2015 – 11:19 am

Cat Psychology book PDF

Specifically, he opened up the skulls of a few cats and severed their corpus callosums, dividing their brains in two. (Aside from the pain of cutting open the scalp, the surgery didn’t hurt the cats, since the brain itself cannot feel pain.) After the cats recovered, Sperry then taught them to navigate a maze while wearing an eye patch. As expected, after several attempts, these “split-brain” cats could negotiate the twists and turns without trouble. But when Sperry switched the patch to the other eye and put the cat back into the maze, something…

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